Article about Voxer in AASA Journal

“When you’re a leader, you don’t have a ton of people that work for you– you now work for those people.”
– Todd Bentley

Lately I have discovered a passion for writing! I have published several articles and books. My second book: Student Voice: From Invisible to Invaluable, ISBN 9781475840025, will be released in January 2018 (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers).

Like the quote above, I work for those I serve – I write for those I serve. The story of the success of the Deerfield Public Schools District 109 (main content for many of my writings) is written for the thousands of students, teachers, support staff, board, administrators, parents, and community members whom I serve.

Another passion of mine is using social media tools for leadership, communication, and progress. To that end, I have published an article in the latest School Administrator Magazine about the social media tool Voxer – see the images below (each is linked to the article/journal). 

As always comments are welcome!

 

 

 

Hurricane Harvey Relief – Sharing from AASA

Sharing a note from my national professional association regarding relief for those affected by the historic storms in Texas.

Our principals are also working with their organizations in seeking out support efforts … 

 

AASA
Dear Colleague,

Once again, we are witnessing a natural disaster that is devastating a part of our country. According to media reports, Hurricane Harvey has caused approximately $160 billion in damages. Parts of Houston, our nation’s fourth largest city, may be uninhabitable for weeks, even months.

Our thoughts and prayers go out to the communities impacted throughout the storm-ravaged areas. As we did with Hurricanes Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012), as well as the Oklahoma City tornado (2013), AASA is coordinating a nationwide relief effort to assist those who need our help the most.

In collaboration with the Texas Association of School Administrators, we are reaching out to the areas battered by Harvey to find out what is needed. Collected funds will be distributed to districts most in-need for repairs and supplies.

We know AASA members have routinely pitched in to help communities hardest hit by these tragedies. We are grateful to the districts and individuals who are joining us in this effort. As you can only imagine, our colleagues in the heavily-damaged areas are in need of such things as books, equipment, furniture and supplies that schools will need immediately after they reopen.

Those wishing to contribute (tax deductible) funds can send their donations to:

AASA c/o Harvey Relief Effort
1615 Duke Street, Alexandria, Va., 22314
Make checks payable to AASA

To learn more about other ways you can help, I encourage you to visit the AASA website. Thank you for your generosity.

Sincerely,



Dan Domenech
AASA Executive Director

 

We are not born to hate – #unlearn hatred

“To exist is to change, to change is to mature, to mature is to go on creating oneself endlessly.”
– Henri Bergson

It’s 2017 – we must, as a society, #unlearn hate, racism, evil, bullying, hurtful speech and cruelty! As we prepare for a new school year, where we in education get an annual “do over” – it’s nice to reflect on the need for us to help create conditions for a better, safer, pro-social world! In this blog post, I’m printing a poem from Robin Davis:

I Have Hidden Super Powers

I don't wear a cape around
My neck, breaking the speed of sound
Or capture bad guys in a web
My powers have never fled
From my heart that's where they stay
Secretly until the day
I see injustice come along
Others are treated so wrong
My super powers become stronger
When I can't take it any longer
Hearing stories of bullying
My special skills kick right in
Set loose, no holding them back
My love alert goes on attack
Not stopping for anything
It won't ease up until I bring
All this hatred to a low
I give one huge final blow
Across the land until there is
No more hate or prejudice
Until then, I'm on alert
Making sure there is no hurt
I will be here till the end
All my powers I will send
Into the hearts of those so weak
Mild mannered, shy and meek
That get pushed around each day
I'll make sure it goes away
This promise will be kept for sure
Any kind of hatred I abhor

Copyright © robin davis | Year Posted 2014

Getting Ready for the New School Year – Looking Back to Look Ahead

“A leader’s most powerful ally is his or her own example.”
– John Wooden
ENGAGE, INSPIRE, EMPOWER
In this blog post I’m sharing an article I wrote for Front and Central … as we prepare for the new school year, I’m looking at the close of last school year!
Home Teaching & Learning Column: Final Bell – What the End of the School Year Means to Educators

Column: Final Bell – What the End of the School Year Means to Educators

This column was submitted by Deerfield Public Schools (Ill.) Superintendent Dr. Mike Lubelfeld.

“Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.”

-Albert Einstein

I’m not sure I completely agree with Einstein’s quote above, but to a veteran educator like me, the end of the school year offers an opportunity to contemplate education, learning, and life.

It’s also an emotionally powerful time for educators. Part drained, part proud, part sad, part happy, this confluence of emotions is what sets teaching apart from other professions. We take care of your children. We take care of society’s future. We give so much of our emotional selves each and every day, so that at the end of the year, we’re mentally exhausted.

At the start of every year, school folks get a “do-over.” Teachers are tasked with facilitating learning for millions of youngsters between the ages of 5-18. For the less than 200 days that school is in session, rites of passage, cultural exchanges, norms, and rituals govern the lives of thousands of communities all across the land.

What else marks the end of the school year? Standards mastered, lessons learned, physical, emotional, spiritual growth. For some the year’s end invites a sensation of fear of transition and change. But for some it’s full of excitement, fun, and energy. And for others it’s the end of their first year — a time they can count their battle scars, or the year they finally retire — a melancholy time when 30-40 year careers come to a close.

Few professions or vocations are more powerfully rewarding than teaching.

I think Aristotle said it best: “The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.” It’s hard to teach children each and every day, fostering growth in the community’s most precious assets. Yet nothing is more rewarding or exhilarating than supporting learning opportunities and helping children realize they are all talented, unique, and special.

Nothing is more rewarding than helping other people find out that they matter, and they offer the world gifts and talents unique to them.

The end of the year is a meaningful time for educators to smile, take a few deep breaths, clean our classrooms and return home to energize, refresh, and reengage, all so we can do this sacred work again at the start of the next school year!

Leadership! Episode 3 of 3 – Perspectives in Education Podcast

“Without excellence, we have lost our honor. Without honor, we have lost our integrity. And without integrity, we are all lost.”
– Anonymous

Nick and I wrote the following as the first two paragraphs of the conclusion of our book (p.95): “The premise of this book is that we all need to unlearn because old conventions stymie meaningful change. In addition, learning is very difficult to unlearn. The “wiring” in our brains is hard to alter. Once we learn what is right, it’s often almost impossible to unlearn and accept a new right. As we stated in the beginning of the book, our landscape as leaders is applied to school leadership, classrooms, pedagogy and educational systems in general.In order to change course and effectively prepare today’s youth for tomorrow, we submit that much of what we have learned in general over the course of our lives, education, and professional careers must be unlearned in order to provide a new tomorrow for our nation’s children. It’s urgent to reimagine education. It’s urgent to pack up the 19th Century and move it into a museum. It’s urgent to unlearn so we can create a modern educational system for our nation’s youth.”

The process of writing a book, going through editing, copy-editing, revisions, rewrites, and peer review was energizing and humbling at the same time. Nick and I are really proud of The Unlearning Leader: Leading for Tomorrow’s Schools Today (2017-Rowman & Littlefield). The three podcast series from Perspectives in Education allows the reader and the prospective reader a chance to get to know us, our perspectives, and the value of the book! Please reach out with any questions – share comments to this post – and if you like the book, please consider sharing a review on Amazon!

 

 S01 Episode 6 Part 3: Mike Lubelfeld and Nick Poylak: Superintendents, #suptchat hosts, and authors.

Episode 6 Part 3: Superintendents, #suptchat hosts, and authors.

Our guests for our 3 part mini series of episode 6 are Mike Lubelfeld and Nick Polyak.

Michael Lubelfeld, Ed.D. currently serves as the superintendent of schools in the Deerfield, IL Public Schools (District 109). He is the co-moderator of #suptchat – the superintendent educational chat on Twitter.

Nick Polyak, Ed.D. is the proud superintendent of the award-winning Leyden Community High School District 212. He is the co-moderator of #suptchat – the superintendent educational chat on Twitter.

Both are co-authors of a book called The Unlearning Leader: Leading for Tomorrow’s School Today

In this episode we discuss:

  • Characteristics of good leaders
  • How to unlearn things of the past
  • Preparing students for college, workforce, and how to be good citizens
  • Their Perspectives on Education

Please share and comment!  Would love to get feedback and suggestions.  If you are interested in sharing your story, please reach out to us!

Thi